More media zombies on slippery slope

I just spotted this article from last year, in which Michael Grade, ITV’s Exec Chairman and ex BBC Chairman slates Joost and YouTube, labeling them ‘content parasites’. He said, “The day that Google or Joost or any of these people start investing £1bn a year in UK content is the day I’ll start to be worried.” Duh! I’ll bet those cash wad buffers in his big shiny office don’t feel so protective now. Sound proof, maybe, but not protective. Forgetting the cumulative talent of the people of the world perhaps?... Read The Rest →

Equilibrium and fractal business models

A fundamental law of physics (in one formulation) states that left to itself any closed system will always change towards a state of equilibrium from which no further change is possible. One example is swinging a pendulum… if you hold it up to one side it’ll be in a state of extreme disequilibrium, then as you let go and it swings back and forth, gradually losing energy, it’ll come to a standstill. Other examples include many media agencies and advertising agencies. You know why. Someone said to me today, ‘but... Read The Rest →

Get out of the way

A few words on the publishing industry, inspired Alan Rusbridger’s [Editor in Chief, Guardian Media] recent comment that “These are the last printing presses we’ll ever buy”; and by an email I just received which included the quote “I would never read a book if I could talk half an hour with the person who wrote it”. Decline factors… - Inefficient many‐to‐many supply chain = high levels of wastage - Risk adverse publishers hamper the emergence of new authors - Entry to distribution channels is a fundamental barrier to new publishers setting up - Market data isn’t successfully harnessed to allow better decision making on which titles to produce - Publishers place more emphasis on fulfilling orders than on understanding customer needs - ICT adoption is... Read The Rest →

More on brand resonance

Everything has a natural frequency of vibration, i.e. its resonant frequency. For instance a glass smashes when a sound causes a vibration that matches its resonant frequency; or the millennium bridge sways like hell when the pedestrians wobble it at it’s resonance frequency. Brands are trying to find consumers’ resonant frequencies. So when a company gets it right, they really vibrate (?!) that individual and forge a powerful emotional connection (lovemark). BUT… we humans are surprising. We resonate at unexpected frequencies (for instance a middle aged business man might listen... Read The Rest →

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